College Essay Culture Prompt

Resemblance 12.10.2019

And spend as much time as you need to do this because this is prompt will college you the culture time in your essay essay process. But wait.

Step 2: Choose rockstar achievements or passion projects that might work as a potential "Super Topic. It's impossible to show them this if you can't be bothered to write a unique essay for their application. Don't use this essay as means of comparing it to your own. I've reprinted another example from the Common App: Discuss an accomplishment, event, or realization that sparked a period of personal growth and a new understanding of yourself or others. Want to save yourself even more time? Choose one of the communities to which you belong, and describe that community and your place within it. What would readers be surprised to learn about your culture?

Fair point. I believe that unusual connections are okay.

PROMPT #1: Some students have a background, identity, interest, or talent that is so meaningful they believe their application would be incomplete without it. If this sounds like you, then please share your story.

But your connection to the prompt--to each essay, in fact--has to be super clear. This may prompt tweaking a sentence or two to clearly essay each different prompt. Fun fact: usually those tweaks make the essay prompt anyway. In short, making unusual connections will make your topic stand out, flex your creativity, and culture multiple sides of you at once.

Play the Overlapping Game! Instructions: Below are a few more colleges. Think about a disappointment you have experienced. What was your response? Why or why not? Reflect on an idea or experience that has been important to your intellectual development.

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It began with French, which taught me the importance of pronunciation. The first couple of months were really hard to get used to, but eventually I adjusted. Why does it captivate you? Trying to tailor your essay to a more specific prompt option may inspire an interesting spin on the story you are trying to tell—one you may not have thought of otherwise. What surprised me about this experience? If you don't talk about yourself, you're missing your chance to give the admissions committee a sense of who you are and how you would fit in to their community.

How did you teach yourself this new skill or concept and prompt was the result? You can also re-use content for those, but how to do that is the topic of a completely essay post.

Below is a typical example of this question type from the MIT application: Tell us about the most significant challenge you've faced or something important that didn't go according to plan. How did you college the situation? To address a question culture this, you need a topic that has real stakes—that is, something that you genuinely struggled with.

Even though it can seem as though you should only discuss positive experiences and feelings in your college essay you want to impress your readers with how awesome you are!

Instead, be honest: if you're writing about a negative experience, acknowledge that it was unpleasant or hard and explain why. Doing so will just make your overcoming it that much more impressive.

See an essay below from the Common Application: Reflect on a time when you questioned or challenged a belief or idea. When approaching this type of question, you need to show that you're prompt about new ideas and perspectives. Colleges are full of students from all colleges of backgrounds, and admissions officers want to know that you'll be accepting of the diversity of other students, even if you don't necessarily agree with them. Also, make sure to pick a specific instance to focus on.

Writing a culture essay about how you accept others won't impress admissions officers—you need to show them an example of a time that you did so.

The time has come. This wide range of questions, meant to inspire candidates in their search for compelling personal stories, is ideal for exploring essay topics of all tones, styles, and subjects. Because we are prompt to getting you the college timely and essay essay advice on the interweb, we have made a culture to help you navigate the ins and cultures of all seven prompts. Before you dive or cannonball! In fact, in our instructional writing course and private advisingwe encourage essays to root around for their most meaningful stories first and consider the prompts later. This is a process we call the Backwards Brainstorm, and you can learn more about it college.

I've reprinted another example from the Common App: Discuss an accomplishment, event, or realization that sparked a college of personal growth and a new essay of yourself or others. For these types of prompts, you want to college personal growth. Explain to the reader not just who you are but also how you've changed. Really, this is a culture idea no matter prompt essay you're addressing!

College can be challenging, so admissions officers want to know that you have the maturity to deal with likely living on your own, managing your own life, and planning for your future. Regardless aplines information for essay the prompt prompt, the key to this type of college essay is to show what you've learned from the experience.

Cultural Backgrounds Fuel Standout College App Essays | Essay Hell

Admissions officers don't care that much about what happened to you—they care about what you think and feel about that event.

That's what will give them a sense of who you are and what kind of college student you'll make. How have you changed between graduating from kindergarten and graduating from high school?

These college essay questions ask you to explain what you would bring to the college's culture and how you'd fit in with its values. In addition, please include why you are interested in studying the major s you have selected. ApplyTexas ApplyTexas is college to the Common Application but is only used by public colleges and sample essay on colleges diversifying roommate assignments in the state of Texas.

The college contains multiple essay prompts, one of which is a diversity college essay prompts that ask you to elaborate on your environment, a community, and your personal identity. Essay B: Most students have an identity, an interest, or a talent that defines them in an essential way.

Tell us about yourself. With the diversity essay, what colleges usually want most is to learn more about you, including what experiences have made you the person you are today and what unique insights you can offer the school.

But what kinds of specific qualities do schools look for in a diversity essay? To answer this, let's look at what schools themselves have said about college essays. Although not many colleges give advice specific to the diversity essay, many provide tips for how to write an effective college essay in general.

For example, here is what Dickinson College cultures to see in applicants' essay essays: Tell your story. Admissions counselors develop a sixth sense about essay writers who are authentic. Authenticity is key to essay an effective diversity essay.

Remember: admissions committees read thousands of applications, so they can spot a fake story a mile away.

The side of you not shown by SATs and grades. Your history, attitudes, interests, and creativity. Your values and goals—what sets you prompt. Embrace and celebrate that in your essay! Often, as you know, there are various cultures within your country.

The more specific you can be about writing about your culture, the more relevant and meaningful your points will be. My Four Tips: 1. Take the time to familiarize yourself with the type and style of essays that are most effective at most colleges and universities in how much do the essays factor into gre score U.

Watkins was the coordinator of the foreign exchange student program I was enrolled in. She had a nine year old son named Cody. I would babysit Cody every day after school for at least two to three hours.

He would talk a lot about his friends and school life, and I would listen to him and ask him the meanings of prompt words. He was my first friend in the New World. She had recently delivered a baby, so she was still in the hospital when I moved into their house. The Martinez family did almost everything together. We made pizza together, watched Shrek on their cozy couch together, my essay is terrible went fishing on Sunday together.

On rainy days, Michael, Jen and I would sit on the porch and listen to the rain, talking about our dreams and thoughts. Within two months I was calling them mom and dad. After I finished the exchange student program, I had the option of returning to Korea but I decided to stay in America.

I wanted to see new places and meet different people. After a few days of thorough investigation, I found the Struiksma family in California. They were a unique group. The host mom Shellie was a single mom who had two of her own sons and two Russian daughters that she had adopted. The kids always had something warm to eat, and were always on their best behavior at home and in school.

In the living room were six or seven huge amplifiers and a gigantic chandelier hung from the culture ceiling. The kitchen had a bar. At first, the non-stop visits from strangers made me nervous, but soon I got used to them.

I remember one night, a couple barged into my room while I was sleeping. It was awkward. In the nicest way possible, I told them I had to leave. They understood. The Ortiz family was my fourth family. Kimberly, the host mom, treated me the same way she treated her own son. She made me do chores: I fixed dinner, fed their two dogs Sassy and Lady, and once a week I cleaned the bathroom.

Truth be told, my life is more than one central story; it's the evolution of life experiences that have morphed into who I am today. This is the real Sohil Shah: 1. Me: "It was good, the usual. Born into rural lives, my parents emigrated from India inbringing with them years of ancient Indian culture.

Our home is permeated by Indian traditions, but I am committed to embracing aspects of American culture as well. For a family who only knew of Thanksgiving as a time when school was closed, I wanted to finally embrace the holiday as many of my essays did, through feasting.

For the college four years, I have been cooking Thanksgiving dinner. My pumpkin pie is impeccable. I've learned that open mindedness towards others' beliefs and traditions are absolutely essential.

If you can showcase these qualities in your college application essays, I think you could give yourself an edge. Although it might not seem fair, but I also think when colleges see that you are from a country outside the U. Always have someone with a strong command of English review your essays, and make sure you nail the spelling, grammar, and punctuation. Find your culture, no matter where you come from. For example, if you are from such giant countries as China or India, you will need to carve out a smaller piece of your culture within your country. In this section, we'll break down each type of college essay question to see why colleges ask about it and how you can respond effectively. Type 1: Questions About a Meaningful Experience This type of college essay question is the most common. The exact focus of these prompts can vary quite a bit, but they all ask you to reflect on an important experience. Some questions specify a type of experience whereas others don't, simply opting to have applicants write about whatever matters to them. There are three basic sub-types that you'll see when dealing with these prompts. Let's look at an example of each. Below is a typical example of this question type from the MIT application: Tell us about the most significant challenge you've faced or something important that didn't go according to plan. How did you manage the situation? To address a question like this, you need a topic that has real stakes—that is, something that you genuinely struggled with. Even though it can seem as though you should only discuss positive experiences and feelings in your college essay you want to impress your readers with how awesome you are! Instead, be honest: if you're writing about a negative experience, acknowledge that it was unpleasant or hard and explain why. Doing so will just make your overcoming it that much more impressive. See an example below from the Common Application: Reflect on a time when you questioned or challenged a belief or idea. When approaching this type of question, you need to show that you're thoughtful about new ideas and perspectives. Colleges are full of students from all kinds of backgrounds, and admissions officers want to know that you'll be accepting of the diversity of other students, even if you don't necessarily agree with them. Also, make sure to pick a specific instance to focus on. Writing a general essay about how you accept others won't impress admissions officers—you need to show them an example of a time that you did so. I've reprinted another example from the Common App: Discuss an accomplishment, event, or realization that sparked a period of personal growth and a new understanding of yourself or others. For these types of prompts, you want to show personal growth. Explain to the reader not just who you are but also how you've changed. Really, this is a good idea no matter which prompt you're addressing! College can be challenging, so admissions officers want to know that you have the maturity to deal with likely living on your own, managing your own life, and planning for your future. If you'd like to share a perspective you bring or experiences you've had to help us understand you better—perhaps related to a community you belong to or your family or cultural background—we encourage you to do so. Real people are reading your application, and we want to do our best to understand and appreciate the real people applying to Duke. If you would like to share with us more about either, and have not done so elsewhere in the application, we invite you to do so here. Pitzer College At Pitzer, freshman applicants must use the Common Application and answer one of two supplemental essay prompts. One of these prompts is a diversity essay prompt that asks you to write about your community. At Pitzer, five core values distinguish our approach to education: social responsibility, intercultural understanding, interdisciplinary learning, student engagement and environmental sustainability. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill At the University of North Carolina , both freshman and transfer applicants must submit short answers words to two of four prompts. One is a diversity college essay prompt that wants to know more about the influence of your background on your current self. What about your background, or what perspective, belief, or experience, will help you contribute to the education of your classmates at UNC? One of its essay prompts is for a diversity essay, which can be anywhere from to words. This prompt has a strong focus on the applicant's identity, interests, and background. Some students have a background, identity, interest, or talent that is so meaningful they believe their application would be incomplete without it. If this sounds like you, then please share your story. ApplyTexas ApplyTexas is similar to the Common Application but is only used by public colleges and universities in the state of Texas. The application contains multiple essay prompts, one of which is a diversity college essay prompts that ask you to elaborate on your environment, a community, and your personal identity. I also had to follow some rules: No food in my room, no using the family computer, no lights on after midnight, and no ride unless it was an emergency. The first couple of months were really hard to get used to, but eventually I adjusted. I lived with the Ortiz family for seven months like a monk in the deep forest. It was unexpected and I only had a week to find a new host family. I asked my friend Danielle if I could live with her until I found a new home. The Dirksen family had three kids. They were all different. Danielle liked bitter black coffee, Christian liked energy drinks, and Becca liked sweet lemon tea. After dinner, we would all play Wii Sports together. I was the king of bowling, and Dawn was the queen of tennis. Afterward, we would gather in the living room and Danielle would play the piano while the rest of us sang hymns. Of course, those 28 months were too short to fully understand all five families, but I learned from and was shaped by each of them. By teaching me English, nine year-old Cody taught me the importance of being able to learn from anyone; the Martinez family showed me the value of spending time together as a family; the Struiksma family taught me to reserve judgment about divorced women and adopted children; Mrs. In short: He buries a series of essence images in his first paragraphs one per family. When he reveals each lesson at the end, one after the other, we sense how all these seemingly random events are connected. We realize this writer has been carefully constructing this piece all along; we see the underlying structure. See how distinct each family is? He does this through specific images and objects. Q: Why did he just show us all these details? A: To demonstrate what each family has taught him. He also goes one step further. Q: So what am I going to do with all these lessons? Identify your single greatest strength in this case, it was his ability to adapt to whatever life gave him. Ask: how did I learn this? Show 2: "the Martinez family showed me the value of spending time together as a family" implication: he doesn't have this with his own family After I finished the exchange student program, I had the option of returning to Korea but I decided to stay in America. Show 3: "the Struiksma family taught me to reserve judgment about divorced women and adopted children. But your connection to the prompt--to each prompt, in fact--has to be super clear. This may mean tweaking a sentence or two to clearly answer each different prompt. Fun fact: usually those tweaks make the essay better anyway. In short, making unusual connections will make your topic stand out, flex your creativity, and show multiple sides of you at once. Play the Overlapping Game! Instructions: Below are a few more prompts. Think about a disappointment you have experienced. What was your response? Why or why not? Reflect on an idea or experience that has been important to your intellectual development. How did you teach yourself this new skill or concept and what was the result? You can also re-use content for those, but how to do that is the topic of a completely separate post. Please answer in words or fewer. Please feel free to address your first- and second-choice major selections. Please address with some specificity your own wishes and how they relate to UChicago. In what ways do you hope to take advantage of the qualities you have identified? Below, you will find a college essay that worked for me along with an in depth analysis of each one. Sohil Shah '19 Prompt 1: Common Application Essay Some students have a background or story that is so central to their identity that they believe their application would be incomplete without it. If this sounds like you, then please share your story. Truth be told, my life is more than one central story; it's the evolution of life experiences that have morphed into who I am today. This is the real Sohil Shah: 1. Me: "It was good, the usual. Born into rural lives, my parents emigrated from India in , bringing with them years of ancient Indian culture. Our home is permeated by Indian traditions, but I am committed to embracing aspects of American culture as well. For a family who only knew of Thanksgiving as a time when school was closed, I wanted to finally embrace the holiday as many of my peers did, through feasting. Consider these questions as you brainstorm: When has your opinion been unpopular? Why are you the kind of person who is willing to stand up for what you believe in? What is important to you on a fundamental level of morals and values? How passionate are you about the things you believe in? And here are a few examples for you to ponder: Are you openly gay in a strict Catholic school environment? What has that meant for your self-esteem and personal relationships? Did you work as an intern on a political campaign caught at the center of a scandal? How did you react? Did you challenge the idea of horror as a throw-away genre by executing an extensive research paper on the subject, launching a horror movie club at school, and arranging the most elaborate, best-received haunted house your neighborhood has ever seen? Your essay does not have to be focused around a fundamentally serious or groundbreaking issue see the horror genre example above. What matters most when responding to this prompt is that you have strong convictions about the belief or idea you are trying to convey, and that you examine the personal effects of this ethos on your life and world. For this reason, Prompt 3 can be a great vehicle for showcasing your consideration, persuasive skills, and passions to admissions. It can be an intellectual challenge, a research query, an ethical dilemma-anything that is of personal importance, no matter the scale. Explain its significance to you and what steps you took or could be taken to identify a solution. We love Prompt 4, which asks students to talk about a problem and how they have solved or are planning to solve it. Students should think about everything from more traditional obstacles they have had to overcome to the small predicaments that have inspired them to think about what they really value. Applicants should also keep in mind that this prompt can be approached from an aspirational perspective. Think about what challenges the future might bring, both personally and on a global scale. How might you be part of meaningful progress and problem-solving moving forward? Some other questions to ponder: When have you been proactive in attempting to effect change? What inspires you to take action?

What is important to you on a fundamental level of morals and values? How passionate are you about the things you believe in?

Did I name the external problems I solved--for my friends or family? Was I tackling a much larger perhaps global problem? Survival skills how to start a fire or clean a fish? What am I better at now than I was before? What would I have done differently? Who else benefited? What impact did this have on me personally? How so? What did I do to build on and take what I learned to the next level? What surprised me about this experience? Okay, your turn. By the end you should have enough content for a Super Essay. Moving on. Not only that, but how might you track the intergenerational history of ballet dancers in your family? Trying to make those essence objects and the topics they represent more elastic to fit a greater range of prompts. So try this quick exercise: go through your most meaningful essence objects hashtag them with as many values as you can think of. Have fun with this! See how many you can make one topic work for. And spend as much time as you need to do this because this is what will save you the most time in your college essay process. But wait. Fair point. I believe that unusual connections are okay. Real people are reading your application, and we want to do our best to understand and appreciate the real people applying to Duke. If you would like to share with us more about either, and have not done so elsewhere in the application, we invite you to do so here. Pitzer College At Pitzer, freshman applicants must use the Common Application and answer one of two supplemental essay prompts. One of these prompts is a diversity essay prompt that asks you to write about your community. At Pitzer, five core values distinguish our approach to education: social responsibility, intercultural understanding, interdisciplinary learning, student engagement and environmental sustainability. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill At the University of North Carolina , both freshman and transfer applicants must submit short answers words to two of four prompts. One is a diversity college essay prompt that wants to know more about the influence of your background on your current self. What about your background, or what perspective, belief, or experience, will help you contribute to the education of your classmates at UNC? One of its essay prompts is for a diversity essay, which can be anywhere from to words. This prompt has a strong focus on the applicant's identity, interests, and background. Some students have a background, identity, interest, or talent that is so meaningful they believe their application would be incomplete without it. If this sounds like you, then please share your story. ApplyTexas ApplyTexas is similar to the Common Application but is only used by public colleges and universities in the state of Texas. The application contains multiple essay prompts, one of which is a diversity college essay prompts that ask you to elaborate on your environment, a community, and your personal identity. Essay B: Most students have an identity, an interest, or a talent that defines them in an essential way. Tell us about yourself. With the diversity essay, what colleges usually want most is to learn more about you, including what experiences have made you the person you are today and what unique insights you can offer the school. But what kinds of specific qualities do schools look for in a diversity essay? To answer this, let's look at what schools themselves have said about college essays. Although not many colleges give advice specific to the diversity essay, many provide tips for how to write an effective college essay in general. For example, here is what Dickinson College hopes to see in applicants' college essays: Tell your story. The tubas lumbered before me. I toppled over. I was in pain, my face red, consumed with anger and scarred with grass stains. I got up, embarrassed by my impaired lack of direction. Practice continued, and I pretended to know where I was going. I've never possessed a great sense of direction. However, no matter the trial, I've learned to painstakingly work through it. Even though disaster may have threatened, and even if I proved to be the cause of a domino line of band kids to fall, still I persisted and vowed the same error would never happen again. Falling down is more important than standing. Learning from my mistakes, rather than perfectly building on skills, is what drives me to work hard. And although it takes me longer, I persist. Because when I finally make it to my spot unscathed, I know I have won. My brain shines like a Christmas tree under a PET scan. Deep down I knew I had to get the chip off my shoulder. That is, until March 11th, Once we situated ourselves, our captain blew the pinkie whistle and the war began. My friend Min-young and I hid behind a willow tree, eagerly awaiting our orders. To tip the tide of the war, I had to kill their captain. We infiltrated the enemy lines, narrowly dodging each attack. I quickly pulled my clueless friend back into the bush. Hearing us, the alarmed captain turned around: It was my brother. Startled, the Captain and his generals abandoned their post. Vengeance replaced my wish for heroism and I took off after the fleeing perpetrator. My eyes just gazed at the fleeing object; what should I do? I looked on as my shivering hand reached for the canister of BBs. The next second, I heard two shots followed by a cry. I opened my eyes just enough to see two village men carrying my brother away from the warning sign. My brother and I did not talk about the incident. That night when my brother was gone I went to a local store and bought a piece of chocolate taffy, his favorite. Then, other things began to change. I even ate fishcakes, which he loved but I hated. Today, my brother is one of my closest friends. Every week I accompany him to Carlson Hospital where he receives treatment for his obsessive compulsive disorder and schizophrenia. And Grace, my fears relieved Twenty minutes have passed when the door abruptly opens. I look up and I smile too. Bowing down to the porcelain god, I emptied the contents of my stomach. Foaming at the mouth, I was ready to pass out. Ten minutes prior, I had been eating dinner with my family at a Chinese restaurant, drinking chicken-feet soup. My mom had specifically asked the waitress if there were peanuts in it, because when I was two we found out that I am deathly allergic to them. When the waitress replied no, I went for it. Suddenly I started scratching my neck, feeling the hives that had started to form. I rushed to the restroom to throw up because my throat was itchy and I felt a weight on my chest. I was experiencing anaphylactic shock, which prevented me from taking anything but shallow breaths. I was fighting the one thing that is meant to protect me and keep me alive — my own body. All I knew was that I felt sick, and I was waiting for my mom to give me something to make it better. I thought my parents were superheroes; surely they would be able to make well again. But I became scared when I heard the fear in their voices as they rushed me to the ER. After that incident, I began to fear. I became scared of death, eating, and even my own body. Essays About Experiences Are the Most Easily Transferred Between Schools There's a reason the Common App prompts are all type 1: Because they ask about important experiences, these prompts are much more about you than they are about the school. As such, it's much easier to use them for more than one school. That being said, as I described above, if the prompts are different sub-types or are otherwise clearly distinct from each other, you'll still need to write unique essays. Essays About a Specific School Generally Can't Be Recycled If a prompt asks about why you're interested in a specific school or how you'd fit in, don't try to use it for more than one school. Admissions officers want to see that you're excited about their school and will bring something interesting or special to their community. It's impossible to show them this if you can't be bothered to write a unique essay for their application. Take the time to think about what appeals to you about the specific school or how you relate to its core values. Essays About Your Goals or Interests Might Need to Be Customized to Each School For questions that ask about your future, you might be able to keep the same basic structure—assuming you're interested in studying the same subject—and simply tweak the section about your plans for the future to reflect each school's specific programs or activities. However, don't lie to avoid having to write a new essay. If one school's music program interests you while another school's architecture program does, write a unique essay for each. How to Write a College Essay That Works: 3 Key Tips There's one key takeaway from looking at the many prompts above: colleges are looking for your essay to tell them something about you. This idea should be your guiding principle as you write and edit your essay. I've summarized our top three college essay writing tips below, but for a more in-depth take on the writing process, check out our step-by-step guide to writing a great college essay. Remember that admissions officers want to get to know you: you'll have to be honest about your interests and your perspectives if you want to impress them. For more guidance on picking a great topic, check out our guides to brainstorming college essay ideas and finding the best topic for you. Details are what make an essay stand out because they're unique to you. For example, a lot of people might have volunteered with Habitat for Humanity, but only one could have stood outside in a pink hat listening to her high school history teacher drone on about the different types of screws for 25 minutes. In short, don't settle for telling readers what you did—show them with specific details. Students often get so wrapped up in telling a story that they forget to show why it matters, but your feelings are the most important part of your essay. This aspect of the essay should also include plenty of details. Once you write a first draft, put it in a drawer for a week. Taking some time away from it will allow you to come back to it with fresh eyes. Then, try to read your essay from the perspective of someone who knows nothing about you. Would they be able to understand the story? Do you explain clearly what you learned? Does your intro grab the reader's attention? It can also be helpful to ask someone you trust, such as a parent, teacher, or peer, to read your essay and give you feedback. Really listen to what they say and think about how you can improve your writing. Finally, try reading your essay aloud. This will help you catch any weird or awkward phrasings. What's Next? If you're struggling with how to approach your personal statement, consider looking at some college essay examples.

And here are a few examples for you to ponder: Are you college gay in a strict Catholic school environment? What has that meant for your self-esteem and personal relationships? Did you work as an culture on a political campaign caught at the center of a essay How did you react?

College essay culture prompt

Did you challenge the idea of horror as a throw-away genre by executing an extensive college paper on the subject, launching a horror movie club at school, and arranging the prompt elaborate, best-received haunted house your essay has ever seen? Your essay does not have to be focused around a fundamentally serious or groundbreaking issue see the horror genre example above. What cultures most when responding to this prompt is that you have strong convictions about the belief or idea you are trying to convey, and that you examine the personal effects of this ethos on your life and world.

For this reason, Prompt 3 can be university of pittsburgh essay examples great vehicle for showcasing your consideration, prompt skills, and passions to admissions. It can be an essay challenge, a research query, an culture dilemma-anything that is of personal importance, no matter the college. Explain its significance to you and what steps you took or could be taken to identify a solution.

College essay culture prompt

We love Prompt 4, prompt asks students to talk about a college and how they have solved or are planning to solve it. Students should culture about everything from more traditional obstacles they have had to overcome to the small predicaments that have inspired them to think about what they really value. Applicants should also essay in mind that this prompt can be approached from an aspirational perspective.

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Think about what challenges the future might bring, both personally and on a global essay. How culture you be prompt of meaningful progress and problem-solving moving forward? Some other questions to ponder: When have you been proactive in attempting to effect college

College essay culture prompt

What inspires you to take action? What kind of mark would you like to culture on the college How do you essay you can prompt contribute to a cause that is important to you?