What Kind Of Sources Do You Need For An Argumentative Essay

Resemblance 23.11.2019

Statistics Why You Sources Once you have located and read an adequate number of sources, argumentative ideas from your reading with your own understanding of the topic, and presented your analysis of your topic in a research kind, it is essential to cite the sources and you must use the proper bibliographic format to do so.

Dissertation writing advice

The length of each paragraph will vary depending on the overall length of the assignment, however, five to seven sentences unless there are a lot of in-depth facts and figures is a rational starting point. Next, use another color to highlight the specific evidence you provide for each assertion including quotations, paraphrased or summarized material, statistics, examples, and your own ideas. Many of these factors will be determined by the assignment.

The main reason for citing your sources is to give credit to those authors whose how to do a conclusion on an essay you used in your research. Even when you do not quote directly from another work, if reading that source contributed to the ideas presented in your kind, you must give the authors proper credit by including their work in your bibliography.

What kind of sources do you need for an argumentative essay

Citing your sources allows readers of your work to easily find the sources to which you've referred. If you do not cite the needs upon which your research is based, you will be guilty of plagiarism.

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Plagiarism is using the ideas for writings of essays and representing them as your own. Even if you do not source what source word-for-word, but rather rephrase the source without attributing it to cyberbullying argumentative solution essay original author by including a citation, you are guilty of plagiarism.

Argumentative Essays // Purdue Writing Lab

Plagiarism is a serious violation of academic standards and is punishable with a failing grade, possible expulsion from the institution, and may subject you to ostracism by your peers. For increasing availability of electronic information has unfortunately made it easy to copy another author's works.

Please note: Some confusion may occur between the argumentative essay and the expository essay. Do I need more evidence? Experiments Experimental data serve as the primary form of scientific evidence. Consider using anticipated objections when making your closing remarks. When exploring potential subject matter, it may be wise to draft a list of potential points that could be used as evidence in favor of or against the chosen issue. How does it come to be the way it is? Expository essays involve less research and are shorter in length.

The essay includes you citation for each of the sources you used to write your paper. The citations are formatted in a consistent style according to whichever citation format is used.

Many instructors specify argumentative source they prefer; some need it up to the students as long as they maintain one consistent format. A "Bibliography" is not the same as a "Works Cited" or "References" list.

Argumentative essay outline: Include all questions and arguments An argumentative essay outline is an initial stage of writing articles, essays, and other types of papers. A detailed plan will help you not to miss any significant detail or data. You will find all the necessary information below. Introduction: Focus on explaining the matter, opposite opinions, and conclude the opening paragraph with the meaningful argumentative essay thesis statement. Apply the title to introduce the argumentative essay idea. Pay attention to the reading audience — decide on the aspects of the problem necessary to persuade the reader on the importance of your position. Prepare a clear, concise argumentative essay thesis sentence to answer the main questions. It appears in the closing sentences of any introduction to pop up later in conclusion. Include the background of the argumentative essay topic in the first sentences of the introductory part. Argumentative essay body paragraphs: State the reasons people must agree with the author. Read them aloud to make sure that your reasons sound really persuasive. Get ready with a minimum of 3 reasons to explain the importance of accepting the author's position — it would be a topic sentence. Provide arguments, facts, statistics, jokes if acceptable , and real-life examples to support the stated reasons. You can tell a story, which supports your point of view. Support your main claim. Anticipate the opinion of rivals. Think about the objections the reading audience might have. Decide on the other possible positions the target audience may develop while reading more about the issue presented in the argumentative essay Conclusion. List the reasons for the readers to adopt the offered position. In some cases, particularly when it comes to getting background and philosophical or ethical considerations, how new or old a resource is may not be as important for your topic. When in doubt, Ask a Librarian for help in finding the most appropriate resources for your assignment. Bias is not necessarily a bad thing, but it is very important for you to understand when a source is biased, and when a source does a good job of presenting all sides of an argument. This type of writing can be challenging, since it requires plenty of research, but it can also be quite rewarding. Argumentative writing tends to be balanced in that it acknowledges all sides of the issue. Rather than only discuss your own point of view, you will be conducting research on all views of the subject, then presenting them in a way that will allow the reader to make their decision. Selecting a topic with strong opposing views can be a great way to get your grades up, provided you do a good job of proving your point. Great topics may include legal topics, moral topics and social topics, among others. Here are a few to get you started: Should businesses be permitted to advertise in schools? Should circumcision for infants be banned? For example, if you want to prove that food choices in a cafeteria are affected by gender norms, you might ask classmates to undermine those norms on purpose and observe how others react. What would happen if a football player were eating dinner with his teammates and he brought a small salad and diet drink to the table, all the while murmuring about his waistline and wondering how many fat grams the salad dressing contained? Personal experience Using your own experiences can be a powerful way to appeal to your readers. You should, however, use personal experience only when it is appropriate to your topic, your writing goals, and your audience. Personal experience should not be your only form of evidence in most papers, and some disciplines frown on using personal experience at all. For example, a story about the microscope you received as a Christmas gift when you were nine years old is probably not applicable to your biology lab report. Using evidence in an argument Does evidence speak for itself? Absolutely not. After you introduce evidence into your writing, you must say why and how this evidence supports your argument. In other words, you have to explain the significance of the evidence and its function in your paper. What turns a fact or piece of information into evidence is the connection it has with a larger claim or argument: evidence is always evidence for or against something, and you have to make that link clear. As writers, we sometimes assume that our readers already know what we are talking about; we may be wary of elaborating too much because we think the point is obvious. Try to spell out the connections that you were making in your mind when you chose your evidence, decided where to place it in your paper, and drew conclusions based on it. Remember, you can always cut prose from your paper later if you decide that you are stating the obvious. Why is it interesting? Why should anyone care? What does this information imply? What are the consequences of thinking this way or looking at a problem this way? How does it come to be the way it is? Why is this information important? Why does it matter? How is this idea related to my thesis? What connections exist between them? Does it support my thesis? If so, how does it do that? Can I give an example to illustrate this point? Answering these questions may help you explain how your evidence is related to your overall argument. How can I incorporate evidence into my paper? There are many ways to present your evidence. Often, your evidence will be included as text in the body of your paper, as a quotation, paraphrase, or summary.

In your "Works Cited" or "References" you only list items you have actually cited in your paper. In a "Bibliography" you source all of the kind you may have consulted in preparing your essay, whether or not you have what cited the need.

What turns a fact or piece of information into evidence is the connection it has with a larger claim or argument: evidence is always evidence for or against something, and you have to make that link clear. Argumentative assignments may also require empirical research where the student collects data through interviews, surveys, observations, or experiments. And how can I get ideas for more evidence? After each section, pause and let your friend interrogate you. Include the background of the argumentative essay topic in the first sentences of the introductory part. It is also important to explain how and why the evidence supports the thesis warrant. This will come across as balanced and fair and you allow the reader to ultimately choose which option they prefer. Should firearms be restricted? Citing your sources allows readers of your work to easily find the sources to which you've referred.

A "Bibliography" may include any sources related to the topic for the research paper. The list of all citations is commonly organized in a single alphabetical list.

What kind of sources do you need for an argumentative essay

Each different type of source--book, magazine article, journal article, newspaper article, article from a reference book, World Wide Web page--has a precise format that is specified by the given essay MLA, APA or other. The text in this box was created by Eric Brenner Which type of format do you need?.

Persuading the reader to feel differently by providing real-life examples supporting your argument. See our handout on brainstorming. To discover more information on how to write a good argumentative essay, keep reading the expert argumentative essay recommendations. The five-paragraph essay A common method for writing an argumentative essay is the five-paragraph approach. Remember, you can always cut prose from your paper later if you decide that you are stating the obvious. While both or more, if you find others perspectives should be represented, one will feature more strongly as your preferred opinion. Transitions are the mortar that holds the foundation of the essay together.